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Posts Tagged ‘productivity’


Mesh Networking for SMB Offices

Tuesday, March 28th, 2017

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If the sounds of disgruntled employees complaining about poor Wi-Fi connectivity are all too familiar in your SMB, it’s time to consider switching to a mesh network.

Unlike traditional Wi-Fi networks that use a single point of origin and optional extender networks, mesh networks utilize a series of nodes to create a single, wide-reaching network.

According to the technology analysts at ZDNet, the cost of implementing mesh networking has dropped to the point where it is now practical for small businesses. Mesh networking is a great way to increase productivity in your office by ensuring a strong network connection in every location.

Decentralized Access: A Better Solution for Resolving Wi-Fi Deadzones

A traditional Wi-Fi network tasked with covering a wide area features a singular router connecting to Wi-Fi extenders. However, the main problem with this configuration is that extenders cannot daisy chain, so you’re still forced to use the router as a centralized access point. If a single extender doesn’t adequately boost the Wi-Fi signal, you’re out of luck. This can be a problem for small-to-medium sized offices where the main Internet connection comes in at one side of the building, limiting coverage and expansion potential.

Mesh Wi-Fi still uses a single Internet connection, but features multiple nodes that can daisy-chain and sport multiple node connectivity to provide signal as far as necessary. A traditional Wi-Fi network would have the router at the access point and an extender in a centralized location, while a mesh network can feature nodes at the access point, a centralized location, and anywhere else in the office that requires coverage.

Mesh networks eliminate the need to run expensive wires throughout the office to compensate for traditional network limitations. Moreover, this system helps to improve stability and performance because traffic can take different node paths if a part of the network is overloaded or not functioning.

Singular Network Solution

Wi-Fi extenders can be difficult to configure and require a change of Wi-Fi networks depending on where you are. The hand-off solution is not very elegant, because the extenders behave like additional networks. For example, you may still get great signal from the main router in your office, but not in the conference room; if you move your laptop to the conference room you’ll still get poor signal from the main router and need to manually change your laptop’s Wi-Fi settings to use the extender.

Mesh networks behave like a singular network between each of the nodes, so there’s no need to change networks as you move around the office. This can be very helpful for smartphones and other devices as well.

An Easier-to-Manage Environment

Mesh networks are much easier to set up and manage. When adding Wi-Fi extenders, each device needs to be managed and set up independently, whereas all nodes in a mesh network share the same setup and management process. Setting up a traditional network means configuring the router and individual extenders one at a time, but you can set up a mesh network all at once. Users may find managing mesh gear easier because it’s typically performed through an Android or iOS app instead of a web page.

If your office is fed up with running multiple Wi-Fi networks and Wi-Fi extenders, it may be worthwhile to invest in a mesh network. Contact the experts at MPA Networks today to see how your business can better approach networking solutions.

Network-Attached Storage: Data Backup and Transfer Options for Small Businesses

Thursday, March 9th, 2017

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Network-Attached Storage (NAS) servers are a great asset for small businesses managing data. For the uninitiated, NAS is essentially a streamlined server designed specifically for sharing files between devices.

Because of their simplified nature, NAS devices are typically easier to use and substantially more cost-effective than full-fledged servers.

While most NAS solutions are space-efficient standalone server boxes, some higher-end routers can also be used as NAS devices by attaching an external hard drive. If your office is looking to increase productivity and improve disaster recovery, NAS may be worth its weight in gold.

Easy-to-Use Data Storage

NAS devices work as an inexpensive, easy-to-use data storage option for your business. These devices are so simple to configure that your office doesn’t even need to have a local IT staff to use them. Once configured, accessing the storage can be as simple as using Explorer or Finder as you would with any internal storage device.

Practical Backup and Recovery

In their most practical form, NAS devices can be used as a backup and disaster recovery option for office computers. This way, if a computer hard drive fails or a laptop gets destroyed, your staff can recover recent versions of important documents and files.

However, NAS does not replace the need for Cloud or off-site backups for vital information. An office fire, for example, would wipe out desktop computers and the NAS. Combining both NAS and Cloud backup processes gives your business the best level of protection from data loss.

Faster Information Sharing

NAS is also a viable business continuity option as it does not require Internet connectivity to work. Employees who use multiple devices, such as a laptop, desktop, and tablet, can use the NAS to access the same files from any deviceThese data servers are also excellent for employees collaborating on the same files; gone is the need to use email or Cloud storage to sync or send updates.

Cost-Effective Hardware Comes at a Price

NAS devices aren’t as sophisticated as traditional servers. Designed only to focus on sending and receiving data, they offer substantially less processing power. You won’t be able to use a NAS device to run an email server, for example, or to run any server-based applications. For these, you’ll need to look into server management solutions.

Because of this trade-off, however, NAS devices cost a fraction of the price of a dedicated server. Moreover, your business doesn’t need to worry about wasting money buying too much or too little storage because you can install additional hard drives in the NAS device as needed.

Security Issues

As mentioned above, NAS servers should not be used as a replacement for an off-site, Cloud-based backup. IT professionals often recommend storing important data in at least three locations: two “on-site,” which includes the computer and the NAS, and one “off-site,” like a Cloud service. Additionally, if your business is using NAS storage, you’ll want to make sure it is only visible to authorized individuals. Security in this case could include something as simple as password-protecting the Wi-Fi.

Use our wealth of knowledge at MPA Networks to your advantage to meet your business’s server and storage needs. Contact us today.

8 Spring Cleaning Tips for Your Office Computers

Wednesday, March 1st, 2017

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When it comes to your office computers, a little bit of spring cleaning goes a long way. Sure, cleaning office computers can seem tedious. But think of it like preventative maintenance on a vehicle: In the best-case scenario, you’ll never know all the breakdowns you avoided.

Keeping your office computers clean and healthy minimizes your risk of downtime and increases productivity.

Here are 8 tips for your next round of spring cleaning:

1. Update All Software

Run updates and patches for the operating system, commonly used programs, and security software on every system. Program and operating system updates don’t just add features; they’re loaded with security updates that keep your devices safe. Most problems with computer security exploits stem from outdated software that allows hackers to break through established breaches that the developer already closed, so running updates and patches is your best line of defense.

2. Run a Full Anti-Virus Scan

After updating all the software on the computer, run a full anti-virus scan to catch any malicious software hanging out on the device. Active anti-virus protection does a good job of safeguarding the system against infections, but sometimes malware slips through the cracks.

3. Run a Full Anti-Malware Scan

Anti-virus programs go after specific, high-risk malware infections, meaning lower-level malware can still find its way onto your computers. Anti-malware programs including Malwarebytes and Spybot are better equipped to identify and remove malware that the anti-virus misses.

4. Defragment the HDD

Older PCs with traditional Hard Disk Drives (HDDs) may experience load time improvements from an annual drive defragmentation. However, newer Windows systems—and all currently supported Mac OS versions—handle this process in the background, so you don’t need to worry about it. If the computer is running a Solid State Drive (SSD), do not bother with the defragmentation process.

5. Remove Unnecessary Launch Programs

It may seem like every program installed on your computer wants to launch itself at startup—even those you rarely use. Removing unnecessary programs from the system startup can help improve performance and reduce login times. Windows 10 features a handy “Startup” tab on the Task Manager that lets users quickly toggle which programs launch with the system.

6. Check and Create Restore Points

Restore points can be a major time saver in returning a compromised computer to full operation. Restore points reverse most of the damage caused by malware and bad configurations, all with minimal effort. Check whether the computer is already using them, and create one if it isn’t.

7. Run a Full Backup

Backups are like restore points for when very bad things happen to a computer. It’s best practice to make at least two backups of a given computer’s files, and store them in different physical locations. This ensures that in the event of catastrophic loss, all the data saved on the computer up until the backup point is preserved. Mashable recommends verifying if automated backup services like Time Machine and Windows Backup and Restore are actually working.

8. Bust Dust on Desktops

This part of the spring cleaning process is literal. As we’ve previously discussed, excessive dust inside a computer obstructs airflow, which can cause crashes due to overheating and even damage components. CNET has a helpful guide on how to go about the dustbusting process.

A little spring cleaning makes for a more efficient office and stronger disaster recovery. The expert desktop support and management staff at MPA Networks is ready to help your workplace in San Mateo, San Francisco, the South Bay, and other Bay Area cities implement better practices. Contact us today for more information.

Digital Sticky Notes: A Time-Saver for Your Entire Team

Wednesday, February 15th, 2017

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It’s a familiar sighting in the workplace: the employee with half a dozen sticky notes attached to their computer monitor. While not the most confidential or elegant solution, these employees are on to something.

Fortunately, technology has stepped in to embrace this practice and increase productivity through digital sticky notes. Teaching your staff how to use this feature helps keep your office not only more organized, but also more secure.

Boosting Productivity and Security

Like their physical counterparts, digital sticky notes have countless helpful applications: They can serve as reminders, cheat sheets, and to-do lists, to name a few.

Employees can create and destroy as many digital sticky notes as needed without wasting any paper. And digital sticky notes actually work better than making notes in a Word or Google doc, because they are continually accessible/viewable when switching between tasks.

Digital sticky notes have the following advantages over physical versions:

  • Content on the notes can be rearranged, edited, and erased at will. Reworking the list does not mean drafting a new note.
  • They serve as excellent interactive to-do listshelping employees stay organized.
  • No physical waste is created when the sticky note is no longer being used.
  • They are more secure because they’re not visible when the screen is off, the user logged out, or the system locked.
  • They come with theoretically unlimited space. Digital sticky notes allow for scrolling when more space is needed.
  • They offer an easy place to store login credentials that all employees in the workplace can access.
  • They provide a simpler platform to manage important, frequently used links than an ever-expanding bookmark list in a web browser.
  • Employees can use simple copy-and-paste commands between programs to add to the sticky note.
  • The notes facilitate email communication between devices and people.
  • They won’t fall or get knocked off the screen.

Sticky Notes with a PC

Windows calls its digital notation program “Sticky Notes.” It behaves similarly to program windows and can be accessed via the Start Menu. Searching for “Sticky Notes” in the search bar may locate the program faster.

Accessing the application will expose all existing notes; if there are none, it will create one. Users can drag and expand these digital notes to any size they deem appropriate. Click the “+” icon on an existing note to make additional notes, and click the “X” icon to delete unwanted notes. Notes can also be color-coded via the “right-click” menu. Power-users may like the available keyboard shortcuts as well.

Sticky Notes with a Mac

Macs also support a built-in digital sticky note solution called “Stickies,” which can be accessed via the “Applications” folder. Users can drag and drop the Stickies to any desired locations and resize the windows by clicking and dragging the corner icons. Employees can customize individual note colors through the “Color” menu and can add shortcuts to media files by dragging and dropping icons over notes as well.

Mac OS even features a handy keyboard shortcut to create a sticky note from highlighted text: “Command + Up Shift + Y.”

Both of these applications are free and included with the computer your employees are already using. Some employees may find digital sticky notes an incredibly valuable tool—but, if nothing else, they will help your team create a cleaner, more secure workplace. If your business is looking to boost its productivity through stronger IT practices, contact the experts at MPA Networks today.

Breathing New Life into Middle-Aged Computers

Wednesday, February 8th, 2017

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Your employees’ computers may not be up to speed anymore after two or three years of use, but in many cases your staff can upgrade or tune up these devices to keep pace with work demands. Upgrades can often be purchased and installed for under $100 a system, offering an inexpensive way to extend the life of a desktop or laptop computer.

Talk with your IT staff or your IT managed services partner to learn more about your options for addressing the classic employee complaint “My computer is too slow.”

Upgrade to Solid State Drives for Faster Loading

Outside of cost-per-gigabyte storage rates, Solid State Drives (SDDs) are a comprehensive upgrade to traditional hard disk drives. If your employees are complaining about long load times when opening programs or accessing files, an SSD upgrade can make a world of a difference. According to the manufacturer Crucial, SSDs are more durable, faster, lighter, and more energy-efficient than their disk-based predecessors.

A few years back, the opportunity cost may have been prohibitive, especially when it comes to your entire staff. But now that prices have dramatically dropped, going SSD makes financial sense.

RAM Upgrade

While CPU upgrades are usually impractical, a computer’s other main performance component often represents a simple, far-reaching upgrade option: RAM. The RAM, or the system’s main memory, handles all the active applications on the system; when it runs out, the computer has to fall back on the far slower HDD/SDD storage. However, the law of diminishing returns applies to this upgrade, and adding more memory than the computer utilizes at a maximum won’t improve performance. Your business may be able to upgrade a few computers’ RAM for free by pulling compatible modules from decommissioned, broken, or unused machines.

Newer Laptops = Fewer Upgrade-Ready Parts

Desktop computers are still the kings of upgrade-ability, but their portable counterparts can’t say the same. The industry is trending toward integrating parts together instead of in a modular configuration, so the RAM and storage may not be upgradeable on some devices. For example, as of 2015, Apple started using soldered RAM and proprietary SDDs, making upgrade-ability and repairs extremely difficult (if not impossible).

Backup and Reinstall Windows/Other Software

This tip applies specifically to Windows devices that are approaching the middle of their lifespan: Back up all important data, nuke the main hard drive, reinstall Windows, and restore all useful applications. Because of the way Windows operating systems work, a part of the code called the “registry” is changed over time with newly installed/updated applications, leading to slower performance. While newer iterations of Windows aren’t affected as badly by this problem, it still exists—and the best way to fix it is to reinstall Windows.

If you’re looking for ways to ensure employee devices keep up with workload demands, the IT experts at MPA Networks are ready to help. Contact us today to get started.

Using Snap and Split-Screen Modes for Increased Productivity

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

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Multi-tasking wizards have a secret: Modern operating systems offer a handy technique for managing multiple windows while maximizing available screen space, significantly increasing productivity. Depending on the OS, this feature may be referred to as “snapping” or “split-screen mode.” The concept, however, remains the same: Users can quickly dock windows on both sides of their screen using simple shortcuts.

Are your employees wasting valuable seconds shuffling back and forth between windows or screens?

This window management trick can make day-to-day work smoother and more efficient.

Modern Display Shifts Make It Possible

Two major changes in our expectations of screen displays created an environment where window docking thrives. The first is a general push to make both application and web content display effectively in both landscape and portrait mode. The second is the widespread adoption of 16:9 monitors in the desktop and laptop world. This combination of factors means that users today can take a single-landscape monitor and comfortably display two applications in landscape mode at once (though it’s worth noting that this method works better on monitors with an aspect ratio wider than 16:9).

Using Windows Snap

Windows 7 first popularized this technique via the “Aero Snap” feature and now uses a retooled version for Windows 10 called “Snap Assist.” The Snap feature is easy to use via a mouse and keyboard shortcut. Mouse users can drag the window against the side of the screen to make the content automatically extend full-vertical and half-horizontal. Windows 10 expands this functionality by displaying a selection of windows to fill the other side of the screen.

The following keyboard shortcuts can then be used based on preference:

  • Ctrl+Up Arrow: Shrink to quarter-screen or expand to full-screen
  • Ctrl+Down Arrow: Un-dock or minimize window
  • Ctrl+Left Arrow: Dock window on the left-side
  • Ctrl+Right Arrow: Dock window on the right-side

Repeatedly pressing either “Ctrl+Right Arrow” or “Ctrl+Left Arrow” lets the user alternate which half-screen segment of their monitor the window occupies, which is extra-handy when using more than one screen.

Split-Screen in Mac OS

Mac OS added this feature in the El Capitan update. To activate this feature on supported apps, click and hold down the green app window corner button, then drag the window to the desired half of the screen. The operating system will display a selection of compatible apps in the free side of the screen; simply click on one to expand it to occupy the available side.

Snapping in Chrome OS

Chrome OS features a similar window management method. Dragging windows to the side of the screen will activate a gray outline that represents where the window will expand in half, quarter, third, or two-thirds orientation. Pressing either “Alt+[“ or “Alt+]” activates left-side and right-side docking respectively.

These tips are even more helpful for employees using dual- or multi-monitor configurations. If your business is looking to increase productivity through IT managed services and IT consulting, contact the experts at MPA Networks today.

Boost Productivity and Security with Google’s Cloud Applications

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

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For anyone unfamiliar with the Google Applications platform, Google Docs et al. are a Cloud-based spin on mainstay office suite programs that can help your staff work better together.

With a zero-dollar price tag (compared with Microsoft Office’s hefty annual subscription fees) and the potential to boost both productivity and IT security, Google Docs shines as a collaboration tool.

For many types of projects that require teamwork, Google Docs streamlines solutions to the most challenging continuity and security issues inherent in transferring multiple versions of the same file between staff members.

About Google Docs

Google’s DocsSheets, and Slides applications offer many of the same features as Microsoft’s Word, Excel, and PowerPoint, respectively. As browser-based applications, however, they are platform-agnostic, and will work across any device that runs a compatible web browser.

According to CNET, Google Docs does not compete with Microsoft Office feature-for-feature, but instead tries to emphasize the features that are most useful for the typical user. These applications can function in conjunction with existing office suite programs or, depending on your preferences, as a standalone service.

Productivity Perks

Google Docs, Sheets, and Slides offer incredible continuity perks that facilitate collaboration in a huge way. Employees share access to files on Google’s applications through a Cloud-based storage platform called Google Drive, where the files update automatically every few seconds to ensure that everyone accessing them sees the latest version. This makes it easy to edit a document before sending it to a client, or use a spreadsheet as a checklist to keep track of progress on a project in real-time.

The Google application suite eliminates scenarios such as accidentally grabbing an old version of a document/spreadsheet and wasting time merging two sets of content into one file. As a bonus, Google’s web apps free up IT staff to work on other projects because they no longer need to spend time implementing Microsoft Office on employee devices.

IT Security Perks

Google’s range of tools offers several benefits from an IT security standpoint. Cloud-based systems like Google Docs reduce the need for employees to transfer files via email, minimizing the risk of spreading phishing links and viruses. And while it may not be the best option for storing confidential information or files, the platform-agnostic nature of Google Docs allows for easy access to shared files on a wide range of device types, including Windows PCs, Macs, Linux PCs, Chromebooks, iOS devices, and Android devices. This flexibility allows IT teams to take advantage of more secure platforms and limit the device pools that could spread malware. 

If you’re looking to increase workplace productivity and security, the IT consulting experts at MPA Networks are ready to help. Contact us today to get started.

IoT Devices to Make Your Office More Efficient

Wednesday, September 21st, 2016

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IoT devices have incredible potential to make your office more efficient. Previously we’ve discussed the caveats IoT devices bring to the workplace a few times, but today we’re going to focus on how these devices can increase productivity.

It’s easy to fall back on the old mentality “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”—but many smart devices can streamline processes and save money in the long run.

Smart Fridge

At first glance it might seem overloaded with bells and whistles, but the staff at Forbes insists the smart fridge is a great idea. The primary function of the smart fridge is the ability to replace food when it’s running low directly from the device itself. Reporting when something is low and streamlining the replacement process can cut down on time spent on fridge inventory and the waste of infrequently used products.

The biggest advantage, though comes from the smart fridge’s energy savings potential. Simply put, it’s more efficient than that old clunker sitting in your break room.

Smart Thermostat

Smart thermostats make it easier to control the office temperature and cut down on climate control expenses. Quartz recommends the devices for office settings on a diplomatic level as well: They can be used to crowd source the temperature setting during the work day. A famous study by the Campbell Soup Company found that thermostat temperatures have a correlative effect on employee productivity.

Smart Locks

Smart locks are one of those devices that add features you never want to have to use, but will be happy to have if the need arises. These devices connect to the office’s Wi-Fi network and can be used with smartphones for mobile access. Primarily, smart locks can be combined with electronic pins that are opened with a smartphone app instead of a physical key or 4-digit combo for tighter security.

In a pinch, you can use the application to unlock the door to let people in the office without actually being there. This can be helpful in situations where the “keyholder” is running late or off sick, or you need to allow weekend maintenance staff in remotely.

Smart Cameras

Smart cameras are a straightforward upgrade to your office’s existing security system (assuming you already have one). They’re relatively inexpensive, starting around $100 each, and offer fantastic protection against intruders. Some smart cameras can be programmed to recognize employees’ faces and alert you if someone unrecognized enters the office. You can also use the cameras to remotely check in on the office while away.

If you’re looking to make your office run “smarter,” contact the experts at MPA Networks to explore all the exciting possibilities of IoT devices. We’ll help you secure the devices on isolated secondary networks to keep your business protected now and in the future. That way, your staff can enjoy all the perks of IoT without worrying about the vulnerabilities.

Water-Resistant Smartphones Are Here: What You Need to Know

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

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Water-resistance probably isn’t on the feature checklist for your employee smartphones—but judging by how many of these devices meet an untimely end via liquid damage, it should be.

It probably doesn’t come as a surprise that dropping the device is the number one cause of smartphone damage at 30 percent; however, liquid damage makes up a substantial 18 percent.

Your business can purchase a range of affordable fitted bumpers, cases, and screen protectors as a line of defense, but waterproof cases like this one are much more expensive and bulky.

It’s “Water-Resistant,” Not “Waterproof”

First and foremost, keep in mind that water-resistant smartphones are not waterproof. If you throw the phone in the ocean or a 12-foot-deep wave pool and leave it there for a few hours, it’s going to break. These devices are built to survive the accidental drop in the bathtub or dinner table spill. Water-resistant devices also have different performance ratings. For example, the Samsung Galaxy S7 can survive being submerged under five feet of water for half an hour.

Why Go Water-resistant?

Water-resistant smartphones can help increase productivity by allowing employees more free use of their devices by lessening water-resistant concerns. For example, an employee with a water-resistant phone will have no qualms about answering a call in the rain. Many smartphones also suffer water damage from sweat seeping in during a workout—not a problem with water-resistant devices. Additionally, a versatile phone can help reduce downtime, data loss, and replacement costs when it continues to function even after being dropped in a pool, submerged in spilled beer, or soaked in a bag in the rain.

Current and Upcoming Models

The water-resistant phone is not an especially new concept; the Sony Xperia Z released in early 2013 is considered the first slim-designed water-resistant smartphone. As of mid-2016, CNET recommends the following water-resistant phones:

  • Samsung Galaxy S7 (Edge and Active)
  • Sony Xperia X Performance
  • Motorola Moto G4

While the iPhone 6S doesn’t have a “water-resistant” designation, Engadget reports that the device holds up surprisingly well against liquid damage, even when being submerged. CNN found that while a dunk test still broke the iPhone 6S, it held up for much longer than the iPhone 5. Additionally, ZDNet reports that the iPhone 6S can alert the user if the lightning port is wet, which hints at future water-resistance.

Your business’s smartphone needs can vary, and depending on partnerships, you may be limited to specific devices on a single carrier. IT consulting services can help find the right water-resistant phones for your staff’s needs. Contact us today for more information on how you can keep the rain from coming down on your smartphone parade.

Transitioning to the Cloud? “Know Before You Go”

Tuesday, January 26th, 2016

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The Cloud is here to stay—and growing before our eyes. Even the customer segment that the marketing world terms late adopters—the last people to “get on the boat” of tech trends—are finally taking a hard look at migrating at least some of their IT to Cloud-based apps.

One big reason is that their existing data center infrastructure has reached the end of the line. In the depths of the Great Recession, belt-tightening and bean-counting left many companies reluctant to spend the capital to replace their on-premise server equipment, squeezing out a few more years beyond their recommended service life. When it’s finally time to usher obsolete servers into retirement, IT managers are weighing the pros and cons of deploying Cloud services over purchasing new hardware outright.

Is the Cloud right for you? Maybe.

The hardware/Cloud argument isn’t all that different from deciding whether to purchase or lease a new automobile. Both options have tangible advantages—which, depending on the salesperson’s objective, they’ll play up. Hardware vendors will insist that direct ownership translates into a higher ROI over the long haul, while Cloud service providers will stress a speedier turnkey deployment with lower pay-as-you-go (or pay-as-you-need) pricing, eliminating a need for hefty upfront financing. Depending on who’s trying to sell what, it’s easy to play with the numbers—and leave the customer’s head spinning!

Before you turn to the Cloud simply because “Cloud looks cheaper,” don’t forget to read the fine print.

As we talked about in our Desktop-as-a-Service (DaaS) series last August, the flexibility of the Cloud can be tempered by vendors’ hidden charges, such as software license fees, shifting between “service tiers,” locking customers into a minimum number of desktops, or other unfavorable contract terms. Service that looked competitively priced at the beginning can look less attractive as costs creep upward.

A Top-Down Approach

Instead of basing these decisions on the bottom line, look at them from the top down. Which IT functions would be better served via the Cloud? Many companies begin with transitioning their email system from onsite servers to Cloud-based email, because the vendor becomes contractually responsible for keeping the system up and running 24/7 (when email goes down, so does your whole company!). They’ll also assume the required day-to-day maintenance of upgrades, add-ons, and security patches, as we know email is the primary gateway for hackers and malware.

We anticipate a future where most small businesses will rely on the convenience of the Cloud, simply networking each desktop into a single modular connection to an outside provider. Our point today is that transitioning to the Cloud involves a strategy for determining the logistics—what, where, how, and why. If you’d like some advice on crafting a successful Cloud strategy for your company, contact us.