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Posts Tagged ‘IT security’

The Mirai Botnet Returns — and Why You Should be Concerned

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

The Mirai botnet refers to a massive-scale network of Linux-running Internet of Things devices turned into remote-controlled bots through a malware infection. Hackers can use the network to run a distributed denial of service, or DDoS, by having the infected devices overwhelm a target with data traffic. Mirai malware and its copycats are an ongoing threat to Internet security and stability. All businesses should be concerned about Mirai’s damage potential and perform their security due diligence to avoid contributing to the problem.

A History of Attacks

Mirai first appeared September 2016, then reemerged in late 2017; its botnet of devices maxed out at around 600,000 infected devices.

While the average person probably doesn’t know what Mirai is, most people in the eastern half of the United States experienced what it can do: it was responsible for the October 2016 wide-scale slowdown of the Internet for the entire region.

Without diving too deep into the technical details, this outage-causing traffic came from malware-infected routers and cameras. In the malware botnet’s initial use, it created a massive 630 Gbps attack on a journalist’s website on September 20, 2017, double the traffic from the previous largest known attack.

While the hackers from the original Mirai attack eventually pleaded guilty, the threat from Mirai and similar malware is still very real. In late 2017, hackers used a variation to seize control of over 100,000 devices in just 60 hours, mostly consisting of unsecured modems made by ZyXEL.

How It Works

Mirai is a worm-like malware that infects Internet of Things devices by using factory default credentials. The malware scans the Internet for dozens of IoT devices with known vulnerabilities from default security settings and seizes them. Mirai exploits human behavior because owners often don’t change the default settings. The malware will control the device and use it to flood a target with Internet traffic when the hackers activate a signal. The malware creates an ad-hoc network of thousands of devices and has them all attack a target at the same time until the target’s web hosting platform is so overwhelmed with traffic it goes offline.

Mirai is dangerous because it inspires copycat malware that can be used for similar attacks. This malware family tends to target low-hanging fruit: low-cost electronics with little security. Device owners will have a difficult time identifying when their devices are infected because they remain dormant between the infection and the attack.

What It Means for Businesses

Businesses should be concerned about Mirai and similar malware in two areas: having their devices seized by the malware and being a target of a DDoS attack. Your business could be a victim of the malware without being a hacker’s target if your devices get infected and become a part of the network. An infection could potentially run up bandwidth usage, lead to slower network connections, and cause device malfunctions. Your business could be a target of a botnet DDoS attack, but your company’s devices are far more likely to be infection targets.

Managing Messaging Tools in Your Office

Monday, March 5th, 2018

When used well, instant messaging tools can increase productivity while offering secure information exchange in your office. Messaging works in business environments because it’s less involved than email, easy to queue and fast to respond. Several free and premium messaging systems that vary in both features and security are widely used in businesses today. Some of the most popular include Slack, HipChat, Yahoo Messenger and WhatsApp.

As with any communication tool, businesses should make sure messaging services are being used securely and for work-related purposes. The following tips can help your business stay focused on work while minimizing security risks when using instant messaging platforms:

Avoiding Distractions

While instant messaging helps speed up work-related communication, it can also be a major source of distractions. Taking an overbearing stance against non-work related conversations can be bad for morale; instead, your administrators should steer the conversation towards productivity in the following ways:

  • Use a service that controls which accounts can talk to one another to ensure that employees are only talking to business contacts.
  • Keep chatroom membership levels appropriate. The smaller the number of people in a given chatroom conversation, the less opportunity there is for distractions. Having too many people in a chatroom can make the conversation difficult to follow.
  • Design chatrooms around a specific group or job, and make sure the name describes the room’s purpose. This will naturally steer conversation toward an appropriate topic.
  • According to Slack, there’s no such thing as too many chatrooms, so don’t feel obligated to condense groups. Having more chatrooms helps minimize conversation clutter.
  • Assign administrators to chatrooms to bring the conversation back on topic if it gets too far off base.

Checking Conversation Logs: When HR Gets Involved

Sometimes your business will have to address bad behavior on instant messaging services over both security and distractions.

Monitoring all conversations is bad for morale, because employees will feel as though management is invading their privacy.

It’s best to read employee conversations only if there’s a report of harassment, abuse or a substantial drop in productivity. Set chat expectations in advance to avoid the need to pull conversation records.

Conversation Security

Your business should ensure your instant messaging platform has sufficient security practices to prevent outsiders from gaining access. Because instant messaging platforms save conversation history, an intruder may access untold amounts of confidential information. It’s also important to make sure employees are using secure login credentials. Administrators can minimize the amount of damage from a compromised account through access control settings. Additionally, many messaging platforms allow your business to control who employees can contact so you don’t have to worry about outsiders accidentally gaining access to group conversations.

Data Security

Employees may use a messaging platform to transfer files with confidential information between each other. Therefore, it’s important that your messaging service encrypts data transfers. Messaging services that store file transfer backups in the cloud can also introduce new security risks, so staff should move sensitive data files through other, more secure means.

The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help your business find the right messaging tools that fit your needs. Then, through business productivity consulting, they can help you set policies that help avoid workplace distractions and implement secure technology use. Contact us today to learn more.

5 Commonly Overlooked Workplace IT Disasters

Wednesday, February 28th, 2018

Because IT staff get so invested in making sure software, networking and security elements are working, they sometimes overlook the human, environmental and contingency planning factors that can invite workplace disasters. In many cases, preventative work becomes an afterthought for IT staff who are expending all their energy on regular operations. Thankfully, planning ahead can help businesses minimize their chances of dealing with the following commonly overlooked workplace IT disasters. Here are five problems to watch out for:

1. Knowledge Loss

It’s common for an IT staff member to take on project ownership, often resulting in excellent work. However, it’s a problem for your business if the only person who understands how a project or a system operates decides to leave for another position. The rest of the team can have a difficult time picking up where the lost employee left off, especially if something breaks or needs immediate adjustment and they’re under pressure to fix it ASAP. Avert a crisis by cross-training IT staff: At least two people should know how anything works.

2. Insufficient Documentation

Proper documentation can mean the difference between a brief disruption and a catastrophe.

IT staff should prioritize documenting everything from programming code to network infrastructure maps to device use walkthroughs.

This information makes it much easier to understand how something works and how to fix it if something isn’t working. Proper documentation helps staff avoid creating disasters when making changes to something they don’t understand. Additionally, IT staff may forget how something works, and documentation decreases the learning curve.

3. Overheating Computer

Too much heat is bad for computers — it causes unplanned shutdowns and eventual device failure. In addition to making sure computer software is patched, IT staff should periodically make sure computers aren’t being used in high-heat conditions. Computers used in areas that don’t have air conditioning, lack clear airflow passage and pull in dust can all result in overheating.

4. Environmental Problems

Heat isn’t the only elemental factor that can prompt an IT disaster: A leaky pipe, a blocked vent or extreme humidity can also damage hardware. These disasters may require replacing computer hardware or entire devices. Servers and network hardware often get tucked away in closets, basements and spare rooms to stay out of the way of daily operations. Issues like exposed pipes, bad airflow, dust, debris, humidity and poor temperature management create conditions ripe for an IT disaster. For example, a pipe leak can flood a room and destroy a server. IT staff should look for and mitigate environmental factor risks.

5. Use of Improperly Tested Tech

While having confidence that you can plug in technology and it will work is a testament to advancement, it is still a recipe for disaster in the IT world. Just because a device turns on and connects to a service doesn’t mean that it’s ready for use. For example, IT staff need to thoroughly test a new AppleTV in the presentation room before a C-level employee uses it in a presentation for investors. While short-term technical failures aren’t a disaster as far as IT is concerned, they can have far-reaching effects in other areas of the business.

In some cases, not having a disaster recovery plan in place before catastrophe strikes could be considered an overlooked IT disaster in itself. The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help your business avoid potential overlooked disasters. Contact us today.

Spectre and Meltdown: Valuable Lessons for Your IT Security Team

Monday, February 12th, 2018

At the end of 2017, the world learned about Spectre and Meltdown: two far-reaching security threats that exploit how CPUs work to expose protected information on nearly every recent PC, server and smartphone. Hackers can use these exploits to do things like steal passwords and other protected private information stored in a computer’s memory through programs such as a web browser.

These vulnerabilities essentially affect every computer, including Macs, iOS devices and Chromebooks.

Hardware and software manufacturers are hard at work fixing the vulnerabilities, but it is up to the end users to make sure the fixes go through.

How the Exploits Work

Spectre seizes the ultra-fast memory on the CPU itself, known as the CPU cache. CPUs use processes called “Branch Prediction” and “Speculative Execution” to guess the most likely upcoming instructions from branches in a program to speed up performance. Spectre attacks manipulate those processes to push data from protected memory into the cache then load that pushed data from unprotected memory. The exploit identifies protected information because it loads faster from the cache.

Meltdown exploits a flaw in processor privilege escalation that allows executed code to get access to protected memory. Essentially, Meltdown breaks the isolation between the application and the operating system. Meltdown is the easier to exploit, but the easier to fix of the two.

What It Means for IT Security

IT security staff needs to make sure that all devices impacted by Spectre and Meltdown are properly updated to mitigate the threat. For the most part, this means staff needs to take some key steps: apply the operating system patches, install firmware updates, update web browsers and update other software that works with secure data, all while keeping the antivirus active.

In many cases, it means just staying out of the way, as Windows and MacOS devices will automatically install the updates. According to Microsoft, end users mostly just need to make sure Windows Update is active. However, some anti-virus programs may block patches and others aren’t compatible with the updates, so IT staff will need to find an alternative option to update those devices.

The Damage Done

Fortunately, Spectre and Meltdown haven’t led to any major security breaches, but researchers have identified more than 130 instances of malware designed around related exploits. So far, related malware seems to be proof-of-concept attempts rather than attacks.

At this point, most of the damage comes from performance degradation associated with the security updates. Both Spectre and Meltdown exploit techniques used to improve CPU performance, so closing those vulnerabilities often involves disabling those techniques. In particular, Windows-based systems running 2015-era Intel Haswell or older CPUs may experience performance drops, with older operating systems being more likely to show symptoms.

However, the performance loss isn’t consistent and can vary between 2 and 14 percent depending on the task. Some processes are affected more than others, with “privileged” processes seeing the most slowdown. Your IT staff should be concerned about this if your business is running virtual machine clusters. The performance loss may mean a hardware update is in order.

MPA Networks offers valuable services such as desktop management that can help your business avoid the pitfalls of Spectre and Meltdown by keeping your computers updated and secure. Contact us today to learn more.

5 Specific IT Considerations for Remote Employees

Monday, February 5th, 2018

Businesses have a lot to gain by hiring remote employees, including the ability to recruit from a larger talent pool and the potential for less expensive workplace accommodations. However, remote employees introduce new challenges in IT security because of the lack of IT centralized IT management. While the majority of security best practices and techniques still apply, your business and its remote employees will need to take a more hands-on approach to properly protect devices and information. Remote workers introduce the following unique IT security challenges:

1. Increased Importance of Human-Based Security Policies

Remote workers need to be more self-directed when it comes to IT security, as there’s no physically centralized IT staff or infrastructure to reinforce safe practices. A business with remote employees should establish a well-developed set of strict security guidelines to protect both devices and online information.

2. Reduced Reliance on Centralized IT to Secure Devices

Any device used for company work needs to be secured with strong passwords, updated operating system software, current antivirus software and regular malware scans. All applications need to be patched to the most recent versions, too.

Hackers take advantage of weak security practices and known vulnerabilities that were patched by attacking unpatched software installations.

Employees will need to make sure all devices they use for work are properly updated and secured.

3. Potential Threats From Personal Devices

Just as with in-office staff, remote employees often use many different devices to do their jobs. They don’t use only the company-provided laptop; they may also use personal smartphones, tablets and computers. While remote IT services can access and update company-owned devices, ensuring personal devices are secured entirely falls on the remote employees.

4. A Lack of Office Network Security

Remote employees do not have the benefit of office network security. Instead, they are likely spending most of their time working on a personal network from their homes. This means employees need to configure their own secure Wi-Fi connection with a strong password and keep both their router and modem updated with the latest firmware. Additionally, remote employees need to change the default password on all networked devices, including the router and IoT devices.

5. Protecting Online Information

While office-based employees transfer a great deal of data over the internet, remote employees do almost all of their work online. If possible, your company can protect this data by configuring a VPN for remote employee use. Businesses should use cloud applications, such as Google’s office suite, whenever possible. These programs are automatically updated and won’t introduce legacy security issues with information exchanged online. Additionally, remote employees are likely to store and share most of their work over cloud-hosted platforms, so your company will also need to consider the security of those platforms.

If your business is considering the addition of remote employees or you want to make existing remote work more secure, the experts at MPA Networks can help. Through IT managed services and desktop management, we can provide your remote employees with security closer to what they’d expect from an office setting. Contact us today to learn more.

Does Fintech Pose a Threat to Cybersecurity at Financial Services Companies?

Monday, January 29th, 2018

Financial services companies should embrace a healthy dose of caution when implementing new fintech in their business. Fintech, or any technological innovation in the financial sector, is not inherently more or less secure than any other new technology, but because it works with substantial sums of money, it is a common target for hackers and would-be criminals. Financial services companies need to keep up with innovations in how people transact business including cryptocurrency, digital cash, blockchain technology, smart contracts and open banking in order to remain competitive. Therefore, it’s vital that companies working with fintech pay close attention to risk mitigation and security.

Fintech Is Growing

Bitcoin is likely the best-known and most publicly discussed story in fintech today. It’s an excellent topic for discussion because it’s well known outside of the financial industry for both its potential and problems. Bitcoin shows its potential with its fluctuating value, starting at just pennies a coin and reaching a peak value of over $15,000 USD as of early 2018. However, Bitcoin also has a high-profile case of the risk associated with new technology: the 2014 MtGox theft, which resulted in more than $800,000 in stolen Bitcoins.

As of early 2018, fintech startups continue to proliferate and innovate. Fintech startup funding reached $17.4 billion in 2016 and was on track to surpass that for 2017.

According to CB Insights, there were 26 venture-capitalist backed fintech firms with a combined value of $83.8 billion in Q2 of 2017.

Fintech is chipping away at the traditional financial institution, so the traditional businesses need to embrace it in order to remain competitive. Consumer demand drives financial services companies to use these new technologies; however, it’s the businesses that shoulder security risks.

Security Vulnerabilities Thrive in Fast-Growth Environments

Fintech’s incredible level of success is the very reason it’s a cybersecurity threat at financial services companies. With such a large number of innovations being adopted in the financial services industry, it’s inevitable that some technology won’t have sufficient security in place. If the vulnerabilities exist, it’s only a matter of time before hackers will find and exploit them. Because there are so many players with so much money on the line, it could lead innovators to push technology to the market as fast as possible at the expense of proper security development. Enterprise Innovation cites a survey respondent who expresses concern that the financial services industry can’t keep pace with how quickly fintech is evolving.

Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to cover all the possible threats that can come from new fintech — because those threats don’t exist until the technology exists. However, financial services companies must ensure they employ proper security practices. Firms need to use fintech platforms securely and ensure devices are always running the latest versions of software for security purposes. Additionally, businesses should be prepared for problems outside of their control with insurance. The 2017 Equifax hack is a warning sign for any business that wants to skimp on security, because it shows exactly how destructive the financial hacks that exploit poor security can be.

MPA Networks offers extensive experience and incredible expertise in providing IT service and support to financial services. If your business is expanding into fintech use, contact us today to learn more about how we can enhance the safety of your information and your customers.

Four Security Threats Your Company Could Face in 2018

Tuesday, January 16th, 2018

Hot off the tail of the massive 2017 Equifax breach that exposed personal information of 143 million customers, businesses are on high alert concerning IT security in 2018. While the IT security industry has been successful in mitigating and cracking down on many common threats, hackers are finding new ways to exploit devices that haven’t received as much attention and protection as PCs and servers have. Trends indicate that your company could be looking at security threats from previously ignored devices and sources in 2018. Be on the lookout for the following threats this year.

1. Missing Windows Updates Over Incompatible Antivirus Software and the Meltdown-Spectre Fix

This is one security threat your company could already be facing: There’s an inherent flaw in the way modern CPUs by Intel, AMD and ARM handle data that can be exploited to leak information. This is a substantial problem because it stems from the hardware as opposed to the software, and fixing it can negatively impact device performance. To make matters worse, some types of antivirus software conflict with Microsoft’s fix. If your business is using one of those incompatible programs, you need to switch to a compatible option to continue receiving Windows Updates as of January 2018. Those Windows Update patches are vital to keeping your company’s computers safe.

2. Internet of Things Devices Become a Bigger Threat

As of 2017, there were 17.68 billion IoT-connected devices, and that number is expected to grow to 23.14 billion in 2018.

Your office may interact with devices like an Amazon Echo, a smart thermostat and dozens of smartwatches. These are all IoT devices that could be the targets of security attacks.

These devices can be used to piggyback onto your office network. Additionally, DDoS attacks from hijacked IoT device botnets could be an even bigger threat in 2018.

3. New Devices Are Targeted

Ransomware is for more than just computers now. In 2018, IoT devices could be the next major target for hackers using ransomware to get your business to fork over payment to regain control. A workplace that’s lost control of the thermostat because of ransomware might be highly motivated to pay. Hackers may also be looking to exploit security holes in your office router and modem, as these devices are often neglected when IT staff applies regular security updates. Hackers often exploit the fact that many users don’t change the default password on these devices.

4. Watch out for Mobile Malware

The growing mobile device user base is making the Android and iOS platforms much more attractive targets for hackers over the traditional PC targets. According to Kaspersky, Android devices are more vulnerable to malware, but attacks are easier to identify and fix. While iOS devices are more secure, it’s much harder to tell if a device has been compromised.

Keeping up with IT security in your workplace is your best bet to avoid disastrous breaches and downtime. Our IT consulting experts can help your company identify and protect its security weak points. Contact us today.

79% of Businesses Were Hacked in 2016. Was Yours One of Them?

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017


Getting caught off-guard in a cyber security attack is a disaster for any business, large or small—and the frequency of attacks is only getting worse.

According to the CyberEdge 2017 Cyberthreat Defense Report, hackers successfully compromised security at least once for 79.2 percent of businesses over the last 12 months.

These figures may be alarming, but keep in mind that all businesses can (and should) be taking proactive steps to prevent attacks, and to make a quick recovery from any breaches. Here’s how you can protect yourself, with help from a Managed Service Provider.

Increase in data breaches

Even if your business has not been attacked in the past year, the odds of staying under the radar aren’t in your favor. In 2016, businesses experienced a 40 percent increase in data breaches over 2015. The situation is especially bad for smaller businesses: 60 percent of small companies that suffer a major cyber attack go under within six months.

Less severe incidents are more common, but businesses are typically ill-prepared for them. A staggering 63 percent of small business owners report their websites have come under attack by hackers or spammers; of those attacked, 79 percent say they have no plan for what to do if it happens again. Most businesses find that mobile devices and social media services are the weakest links in their online security.

Protective Measures against Cyber Attack

The best protective measures against digital security threats are to secure networks, websites, applications, and social media platforms, and to implement a reliable backup system. The following tips provide a baseline to help your business minimize its security risks:

  • Use unique, secure passwords for all accounts including internal services, external services, email, and connected social media to prevent data breaches.
  • Activate “2-Step Verification” for applicable services.
  • Use Secure HTTP for websites and applications that pass personal information.
  • Take advantage of desktop management services; make sure computers are running up-to-date software to minimize exposure to known security holes.
  • Keep antivirus and anti-malware software updated; run scans on a frequent basis to protect from malware infections.
  • Program internally developed services to prevent SQL injection.
  • Secure the Wi-Fi/Internet and manage employee credentials.
  • Secure mobile devices, tablets, and laptops so they can be disabled if lost or stolen.

In Case of Emergency: Disaster Recovery

Ransomware is major concern for businesses these days: 61 percent of businesses say they were compromised at least once by malware demanding payment to return data. Unfortunately, some companies that decide to pay the ransom still don’t get their data back. The best thing your company can do to protect itself from ransomware is to limit the amount of damage an attack can do through backup and disaster recovery. Using the “3-2-1 backup rule” and running frequent backups can be the difference between losing all of your data permanently, and losing a single day’s work.

Digital security should never take a break. If your business is looking to build a better defense against cyber threats, the experts at MPA Networks can help with both desktop and server management. Contact us today to learn more.

Android and IOS: Is the Device Just Old, or Is It Obsolete?

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017


When trying to determine if a piece of technology is simply old or completely obsolete, keep in mind that there are different criteria for Android and iOS devices than for desktop and laptop computers. An employee stuck using an obsolete device is likely, after all, to argue that replacing it would increase their productivity.

On the flip side, replacing functional devices too often can spiral out of control into unnecessary expenses.

An IT consulting firm can help your business understand how long a device should remain in use, a safe time range for buying older models, and how to plan upgrade cycles.

When Does A Device Become Obsolete?

The general rule is that a device becomes obsolete about four years after its release. This means that trying to save money by purchasing older devices on the cheap may not work out well, as they are unlikely to receive updates as long as a newer device. Usually you can buy only the most recent and second most recent smartphone devices new, but older refurbished devices are readily available.

Performance Issues with Old Devices

Determining if a device is aging vs. obsolete is pretty straightforward: If the employee can still complete all necessary work with the device, it is not yet obsolete.

However, older devices often have performance issues; notably, they may operate slower than the latest models. Older devices using Android often receive updates late, too, so users won’t receive security and interface improvement patches as soon as they’re available.

When Does a Smartphone Become Obsolete?

Forbes paints a pretty grim picture of aging devices, declaring that smartphones have about two years before they’re obsolete. Still, users can typically continue on without any major problems for an additional year or two.

Once obsolete, however, many devices are prone to disruptive conditions:

  • Security updates are no longer provided.
  • Vital applications are no longer compatible with the operating system.
  • The web browser ceases to display web pages correctly.

When Does Apple Consider Devices Obsolete?

Officially, Apple considers any product more than five years old obsolete, meaning the company tends to support their devices for a little longer than Android distributors. Apple usually supports iOS devices with the latest operating system for about four years. At this point the device will not receive updates, but it will still likely work for a while longer.

The device typically hits the obsolete category when it no longer runs the most recent version of iOS. If you buy an iOS device that’s already been on the market for two years, you’ll have to plan to replace it in another two years. A one-year-old device will be good for at least three years.

How Long Can Android Users Expect Operating Upgrades?

Android devices have a two-tier obsolescence system in which system updates stop coming and applications stop working. Android is a much more difficult case to gauge because updates need to come through Google, go to the manufacturer, and then reach the phone provider.

Android users can expect operating upgrades for two years after the phone is released, and a few additional months of security updates; both are soft obsolescence moments. What finally ends an Android device’s life (or, at least, its usefulness) is application incompatibility after about four years, which is dependent on the developer. Most try to support the oldest version possible, but this is not always the case.

If you want to make sure your employees are using up-to-date devices that increase productivity, MPA Networks can provide an IT and productivity assessment. Contact us today.

Scheduling Security: Take Control of Your OS Updates

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017


It happens to everyone: You turn your computer back on after you intended to leave the office, or come in early to get a head start on a new project, only to be greeted by a 20-minute operating system (OS) update session. This common workplace frustration turns what should have been a four-minute job into a half-hour ordeal, forcing you to stay behind or defeating any time gains from starting early.

OS updates provide essential security fixes that keep your business safe, but the platforms have a knack for pushing updates at what feels like “the worst possible time.”

Here’s what you can do to remain one step ahead of your updates at all times.

Change the Default Settings

Don’t leave operating system updates on their default settings, because they’re likely to interfere with work when you need the devices. The solution to this productivity- and attitude-killing problem is to adjust the system settings to force the updates at a specified time when your team won’t need them. Other software, like Office, Photoshop, and web browsers, tend to be less of a problem, since their update sessions are usually much quicker.

Updates Are a Security Issue

The worst solution to update inconvenience is to disable automatic updates. While updates that don’t add any new features may seem irrelevant, they’re actually doing lots of work keeping you safe behind the scenes in areas like IT security and virus/malware prevention.

According to TrendMictro, malware and other security exploits tend to target known security holes that have already been closed through updates and patches. Instead of finding new exploits, it’s easier for hackers to continue to exploit the old ones and take advantage of users who do not update their computer software.

Schedule Around Work to Increase Productivity

Microsoft usually posts their updates on the second Tuesday of every month, which is commonly known as “Patch Tuesday.” However, this may not work well with your business if it disables employee computers Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. The ideal time for updates will differ depending on your business, but for the typical Monday-to-Friday 9-to-5 office, you will be best served by installing updates around 2 a.m. on Sunday morning. Devices can even be individually customized for each employee based on their personal schedule.

The IT Consulting experts at MPA Networks, serving San Francisco, San Mateo County, San Jose, and other San Francisco Bay Area cities, are ready to help your business make technology work for you, not against you. Scheduling updates is a desktop management and support issue, which IT Managed Services can deliver. Contact us today to find out how we can help you better manage your office computers.