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Posts Tagged ‘anti-malware’


7 Ways to Keep Work Secure on Employee Personal Devices

Monday, May 14th, 2018

Technology improvements have made it easy for employees to get work done on their personal devices from anywhere. However, that freedom comes with additional security risks and requires extra diligence to keep data secure. Safeguarding information is a combined process of utilizing technology and educating staff. The following considerations will help your business keep work secure on employee personal devices.

1. Always Update/Patch Software

Hackers invest time trying to find new ways to bypass security or take advantage of personal apathy and laziness.

According to PC World, failing to install the latest patches and updates for software is the top security risk for both business and private use.

Hackers can look for known exploits that the software creator closed and use them against people who haven’t updated the software to close that security hole. Unlike with business-owned devices, your business really can’t force employees to install software that will prompt updates, so it becomes a matter of training.

2. Use Cloud Apps

Cloud applications for both computers and mobile devices offer some excellent security benefits for your business, especially when your employees access them on personal devices. Cloud apps shift much of the data security burden to the server side, which alleviates many of the security problems that could come from traditional apps run on employee devices. Cloud email is an excellent example of this because the server can handle scans for phishing, malware and other malicious attacks before the content ever makes it to the employee device. Cloud apps generally run the most current software versions, so your business won’t have to worry about employees running updates.

3. Encourage Strong Antivirus and Anti-Malware Practices on All Devices

While employees don’t need to use the same security software your business runs on their personal devices, they do still need quality security software. There are many free and low-cost security programs for personal users that provide excellent protection. Your IT staff can help make recommendations for employees on personal devices.

4. Train to Avoid Phishing Scams

While security software and cloud apps do a great job of catching phishing scams, some still might slip through. That’s why it’s important to train your employees in how to identify and avoid phishing scams.

5. Use Strong Passwords, Password Managers and 2-Step Verification

Employees should also keep their accounts secure by using sophisticated access credentials. This means using 2-step verification for all accounts and programs when possible and using password managers to protect their credentials. Employees should be trained in creating strong passwords in the event that more advanced security techniques don’t work.

6. Practice Public Wi-Fi Safety

In general, employees should avoid using public Wi-Fi when working with confidential information. If employees are going to do work on Wi-Fi outside of the home or workplace, they need to be trained in identifying fake access points and how to tell if a library, restaurant or other business’s network is secure.

7. Consider Using Remote Wipe or Lock Software

As a final effort, your business should encourage employees to install software that allows them to remote wipe or lock mobile devices and laptops they are going to use for work purposes. That way if someone steals that device, the damage will be limited to the financial loss of the hardware and not related to a data security breach.

The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help your business implement both software and training practices to help keep your data safe when employees use their personal devices for work. You can read our previous blog on tips for managing remote employees for even more information on keeping data safe. Contact us today to learn more.

Antivirus Software: When One Is Better Than Two

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

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If your company’s antivirus software is letting you down, you should think twice before installing a second one on a computer: It may actually make things worse.

Multiple antivirus programs working in conjunction on the same device is not a case of “the sum is greater than the parts” but rather “less is more.”

With many viable free solutions like AVG, Avast, and Avira, it can be very tempting to install backup for a paid option. However, the interaction between multiple antivirus programs leads at best to, essentially, nothing. At worst, it will be detrimental to system performance, stability, and security.

Stepping on Toes

The primary reason that running simultaneous antivirus programs on the same device is a bad idea is that the two programs will confuse one another for malware infections and try to eliminate each other. According to PC World, the antivirus scan conflicts can spill out and cause other programs to fail, while making the operating system less stable. Computer users may immediately notice general slowdown and shorter battery life after installing a second antivirus program.

Users may also be plagued with continuous “false alarm” messages after threats have been removed because the act of one antivirus program removing an infection will be seen by the other as a malware action. Therefore, if you’re installing a new antivirus program on a computer, you’ll need to remove the old one first. This includes removing Windows Defender.

Anti-Malware Scanning Software: Antivirus Backup Exists

Backup exists, but it’s not found in additional antivirus programs. Instead, your business can utilize additional programs commonly referred to as “anti-malware” that are specifically designed to catch infections antivirus software misses for improved protection.

The term “antivirus” is a bit misleading because the programs actually protect computers from a wide range of software-based threats on top of viruses including Trojans, rootkits, worms, and ransomware. Antivirus refers to a software security program that runs in the background at all times as an active form of protection. Anti-malware programs including Malwarebytes, SuperAntiSpyware, and Spybot work through “On Demand” scans, meaning they can be used periodically to clean malware infections.

The Recovery Clause

In disaster recovery situations, your IT staff may need to install a different antivirus program to combat a malware infection that the currently installed software can’t remove. In this situation, the old software will need to be disabled or uninstalled before the new program can get to work.

If you’re looking for better digital security options for your office, contact MPA networks today. Use our experience in IT consulting to your advantage for assistance in both preventing and reducing downtime over malware threats.

The Best Way to Check Your PCs for Malware—Fast and FREE

Tuesday, April 12th, 2016

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A couple months back, we touched on the story of our normally tech-savvy friend who got tricked into allowing his desktop PC to be infected with obvious malware. At first, he had the sickening feeling that comes with a virus-infected computer—but thanks to some quick thinking and online research, he downloaded several popular free anti-malware apps to isolate and remove the malware programs before they could inflict real damage (identity theft, or worse). He figured that by running multiple anti-malware apps, his computer would be effectively “cross-checked” and his hard drive would once again be clean and secure—fingers crossed.

Running the Gauntlet of Anti-Virus Scan Engines

Running more than one anti-malware app was indeed a wise idea. But what if you could scour your system for malware using as many as 57 different name-brand anti-virus scan engines—in less than a minute, and all for free?

It’s a terrific one-stop Windows utility few users know about, but we’re happy to share it with you today with step-by-step instructions:

  • From the Options menu in Process Explorer (in the upper menu bar), choose VirusTotal.com > Check VirusTotal.com. VirusTotal by itself is a free site that will scan suspicious files and URLs. But linked through Process Explorer, it will analyze your entire operating system using at least 50 proprietary malware detection engines, including those from leading anti-virus brands like AVG, Bitdefender, Kaspersky, McAfee, and Symantec. A cybercrook may be able to write malicious code that eludes a few anti-malware apps—but over 50? That’s quite a comprehensive gauntlet, if not virtually impossible.
  • A Virus Total column will appear to the far right of the dashboard, with a ratio listed for every open application and process. A zero ratio (0/55) means all scanning engines concur the program is safe. A tiny ratio (2/55 or 3/55) is most likely a “false positive” (probably no real threat), while a heavy ratio (10/55 or higher) indicates multiple engines target it as likely malware.

“Less Is More”… But Not When It Comes to Cyber Safety

Learn more about uncovering malware via Process Explorer from InfoWorld security columnist Roger Grimes in the embedded video here. As a free utility direct from Microsoft, we highly recommend it as a simple yet comprehensive supplement to your current anti-virus software. Whenever you discover possible malware lurking on one or more of your company’s PCs, contact us immediately to help quarantine and safely remove it.