alt tag

Posts Tagged ‘3-2-1 concept’


79% of Businesses Were Hacked in 2016. Was Yours One of Them?

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

broken-business-2237920_640

Getting caught off-guard in a cyber security attack is a disaster for any business, large or small—and the frequency of attacks is only getting worse.

According to the CyberEdge 2017 Cyberthreat Defense Report, hackers successfully compromised security at least once for 79.2 percent of businesses over the last 12 months.

These figures may be alarming, but keep in mind that all businesses can (and should) be taking proactive steps to prevent attacks, and to make a quick recovery from any breaches. Here’s how you can protect yourself, with help from a Managed Service Provider.

Increase in data breaches

Even if your business has not been attacked in the past year, the odds of staying under the radar aren’t in your favor. In 2016, businesses experienced a 40 percent increase in data breaches over 2015. The situation is especially bad for smaller businesses: 60 percent of small companies that suffer a major cyber attack go under within six months.

Less severe incidents are more common, but businesses are typically ill-prepared for them. A staggering 63 percent of small business owners report their websites have come under attack by hackers or spammers; of those attacked, 79 percent say they have no plan for what to do if it happens again. Most businesses find that mobile devices and social media services are the weakest links in their online security.

Protective Measures against Cyber Attack

The best protective measures against digital security threats are to secure networks, websites, applications, and social media platforms, and to implement a reliable backup system. The following tips provide a baseline to help your business minimize its security risks:

  • Use unique, secure passwords for all accounts including internal services, external services, email, and connected social media to prevent data breaches.
  • Activate “2-Step Verification” for applicable services.
  • Use Secure HTTP for websites and applications that pass personal information.
  • Take advantage of desktop management services; make sure computers are running up-to-date software to minimize exposure to known security holes.
  • Keep antivirus and anti-malware software updated; run scans on a frequent basis to protect from malware infections.
  • Program internally developed services to prevent SQL injection.
  • Secure the Wi-Fi/Internet and manage employee credentials.
  • Secure mobile devices, tablets, and laptops so they can be disabled if lost or stolen.

In Case of Emergency: Disaster Recovery

Ransomware is major concern for businesses these days: 61 percent of businesses say they were compromised at least once by malware demanding payment to return data. Unfortunately, some companies that decide to pay the ransom still don’t get their data back. The best thing your company can do to protect itself from ransomware is to limit the amount of damage an attack can do through backup and disaster recovery. Using the “3-2-1 backup rule” and running frequent backups can be the difference between losing all of your data permanently, and losing a single day’s work.

Digital security should never take a break. If your business is looking to build a better defense against cyber threats, the experts at MPA Networks can help with both desktop and server management. Contact us today to learn more.

The Three Copies Rule: Why You Need Two Backups

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

usb-932180_640

Anyone who has ever lost years of work due to computer failure will tell you that backing up your devices can save you considerable heartache and frustration. Reliable, redundant, and regular data backups are your business’s best strategy for disaster recovery—but two copies of your data may not be enough.

IT pros across the world have developed the “3-2-1” backup philosophy to maximize your restoration capacity following a data disaster.

The “3-2-1” Concept

The “3-2-1” approach is simple:

  1. Store three copies of your data.
  2. Utilize multiple storage formats.
  3. Keep one copy off-location.

TrendLabs says that having two backups of your data (meaning three copies total) is all about redundancy. IT professionals have nightmares about experiencing computer or server failure and preparing to restore the backup, only to find that the backup has failed as well. Your business can prevent this situation only by keeping two backup copies of all your important data.

We can’t stress often enough that three copies means three separate devices. Backing up data to a second hard drive in the same computer, or a connected SD card, does not count. This will only protect your data in the event that one of the hard drives breaks.

Some useful backup devices include:

  • External hard drives
  • NAS
  • Cloud storage
  • DVD/Blu-Ray discs
  • Flash drives
  • SD cards

Two Formats: Diversify Storage Media

Using different types of storage for backup improves reliability: It not only diversifies the factors that could cause the backup to fail, but also acts as an extra layer of protection. For example, if both backups are on external hard drives and exposed to a large magnet, both would be destroyed. However, a second copy stored on optical media or a flash drive would survive.

The two backup locations could include a backup external hard drive and cloud storage, or a DVD archive and an onsite NAS server. According to PC & Tech Authority, NAS servers are a great backup option for offices with several networked computers. We’ve discussed storage format longevity in previous blog posts if you need help deciding which one is right for you.

Keep at Least One Copy Offsite for “Catastrophe Recovery”

Catastrophe recovery is another way to describe a worst-case disaster recovery scenario: for instance, the hard drive didn’t fail, but a flood leveled your office, or someone stole both the computer and the backup in a burglary. In order to prevent an outright catastrophe, it’s not safe to keep every copy of your important data under the same roof.

This means, of course, that one of your backup copies should be stored in a secondary locationthe farther the better. The offsite backup could be, for example, a cloud backup, or an external hard drive stored in a bank deposit box. When working with a non-cloud, off-site solution, it helps to swap out two storage devices on a weekly basis.

If your company is looking to streamline its disaster recovery practices with IT Managed Services, contact the experts at MPA Networks today.