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Productivity Posts


Managing Automatic Updates: Balancing Security With Convenience

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

Running automatic updates for applications and operating systems helps protect your company’s digital devices, but those updates can harm productivity if not well managedUnpatched software is the single biggest security risk in the workplace, so it’s essential to get those updates installed as soon as possible.

However, ASAP updates can be a substantial disruption to work if they run at a bad time. Your business can take advantage of tools, services and techniques to streamline the updating process to minimize the time your software is vulnerable without disrupting work.

General Tips for Updates

Your employees don’t want their computers to get hung up for 30 minutes running through updates in the middle of the workday. However, turning off automatic updates can leave devices vulnerable for a long period of time. The following tips will help streamline the update process for your business:

Use Software Update Management tools and Desktop Management Services whenever possible to automate the process.If automation is not an option, have employees shut down computers at the end of the day and run any updates from notifications.

Use the automated system to push updates at a time when employees aren’t working.

  • Automated updates should run at least once a week, but twice is better.
  • Run updates for individual programs as soon as possible, and only push “later” when busy.
  • Don’t avoid installing updates because of fear of incompatibility: IT will have to work around incompatibilities as they arise.

Mobile Device Updates

Android and iOS devices tend to balance convenience and security with updates. Application stores and service providers generally notify users and implement updates in a timely manner. Apps will update in the background when the device is not in use, and the device will alert the user of a pending operating system update and let them choose when the update will run.

The problem with smartphone updates comes from the limited amount of space on the device. If the phone doesn’t have enough space to download the update, the automatic update won’t work, and employees will fall behind. The most viable way to work around this issue is to buy devices with plenty of built-in storage.

Operating Systems

Computer operating system patches are among the most important updates your business needs to run for security purposes. Windows 10 embraces this concept, but the well-intended nature can be a usability nightmare for users who aren’t under the protection of a Software Update Management system. Windows 10 can be pushy with updates (to the point where there’s a meme in the mix.) An unwanted Windows 10 update can be a massive pain to employees in the middle of the workday because it can take a half hour or longer to complete.

The problem stems from Windows 10 Home’s omitting the ability to adjust the how the automatic updates system works. Professional and Enterprise version users can adjust the system to prompt the user to schedule the update install, so your workplace is better off upgrading any computers running the Home edition. Microsoft usually sends out updates on the second Tuesday of each month which inconveniently situates the update in the middle of the week and can turn a required reboot into a substantial disruption.

If your Bay Area business is trying to get a better handle on IT security by keeping up with software patches, the desktop support and management experts at MPA can help. Contact us today to learn more.

 

Making the Switch to BYOD? Pros, Cons and Security Implications to Consider First

Tuesday, June 26th, 2018

Making the switch to a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) business environment extends well beyond the decision to let employees choose their devices. Your business should look at the pros and cons of the concept before deciding how to approach it and to what extent your company will embrace it. Your business needs might better work with partial BYOD over complete BYOD.

The BYOD concept requires making adjustments to your business culture by shifting the role of security toward your entire staff. It’s crucial for businesses to focus on BYOD-related security risks before opening the gates.

The Pros of BYOD

The big lure of BYOD is it can dramatically reduce hardware and administration expenses. Employees likely already use their personal devices for some work-related tasks; this approach simply makes it official. Both the business and its workers stand to benefit, because employees may invest more effort in taking care of hardware when they have both a personal and a professional stake. BYOD also allows for device consolidation: Employees only need to keep track of one phone at work instead of two.

Employees develop preferences for specific brands, platforms and form factors based on how well their tools help them do their jobs.

A BYOD workplace enables employees to choose devices they are familiar and comfortable with, which can increase productivity. Employees like BYOD because they can pick the tools they want. BYOD helps businesses avoid situations where employees are stuck using devices they tolerate in exchange for devices they are more likely to love, which ultimately makes employees happier.

The Cons of BYOD

Unfortunately, much of the money saved through hardware and administration expenses can come back in the form of higher support costs. Because employees will inevitably choose a large range of devices, your business won’t have the same level of standardization. This makes it impossible to have a uniform approach to end-user support. Support will have to manage a much larger range of potential issues. Additionally, BYOD can result in incompatibility issues in which devices can’t access essential services or use necessary software.

The Essential BYOD Security Concerns

While increased device diversity means that a hacker will have a more difficult time using the same exploit to access multiple devices on your business network, BYOD is much more heavy-handed in “cons” for security. The following are just some of the many security issues facing BYOD workplaces:

  • Businesses face a loss of control for software security. BYOD workplaces can’t rely on IT to make sure all employees implement all software security updates and keep approved security software running on all devices.
  • IT may not be able to support a given device because it is employee owned. A crash may result in lost work and information that would’ve been saved on a business-owned device.
  • Employees need to implement and maintain their own data backup practices.
  • Businesses have less control over workplace device-use monitoring because of employee privacy concerns.
  • Registering a large number of BYOD devices for work use can be burdensome.
  • Companies may encounter difficulties in wiping a lost device, which can expose confidential business information.
  • A business may need to switch to cloud-based applications in order to better protect business information.
  • Organizations face potential problems with HIPAA compliance, especially if someone steals information.

A security-first culture is more important than ever in businesses that use BYOD. Is your Bay Area business looking to adopt a BYOD strategy? The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help; contact us today.

Giving a Presentation: A Technology Preparedness Checklist

Monday, March 19th, 2018

Giving a presentation can be stressful, so dealing with technology issues at the last minute is the last thing you want when attempting a professional delivery. The following technology preparedness checklist can help you make a good impression rather than forcing the audience to sit through on-the-fly troubleshooting.

A presenter should test the presentation where they are going to deliver it in advance.

Here’s what to do:

Hardware/Software Preparation Checklist

  • Run a “dress rehearsal” by testing any new hardware against the presentation delivery workflow. If this is the first time you’ve presented in a particular environment, run through loading your presentation and making sure the whole thing works correctly.
  • Ensure you have working login credentials for the presentation device and network, and test them in advance. Some computers will run a time-consuming new account setup script the first time a user logs into a device with network credentials.
  • Be sure the presentation device is running the most recent software updates. This will avoid surprise “update needed” popups and forced updates that can derail presentations.
  • Disable screen savers, phone calling and background messaging programs to avoid unwanted interruptions. Turn off any other disruptive applications you can identify.
  • Ensure the presentation device is compatible with the screen mirroring monitor or projector, and make sure you have all the necessary adapters and cables. Check in advance to see if you’re using an AppleTV, Miracast, Roku, WiDi or direct cable connection for monitor/TV/projector access. Make sure your device is compatible with the connection platform. Don’t rely on the IT staff to have all of the necessary cables ready.
  • Know your device’s screen mirroring shortcuts. For example, Windows devices use “Windows Key + P.”
  • Make sure audio playback works on the presentation device if you’re using sound in your presentation. Working video does not guarantee working audio.

Software Compatibility Checklist

  • Ensure your presentation files are compatible with the presentation device’s software. For example, if you’ve prepared a speech in Keynote, you may need to convert it to PowerPoint.
  • Check for embedded media file compatibility. For example, an embedded .MOV file may work on the PC on which you created the presentation, but it might not work on the presentation device. If you’re sure you’ll have internet access, you can link to or insert the videos from website sources to remove compatibility issues.
  • Run through the presentation and check for formatting issues on the presentation device. The presentation device may be using a different version of the software and thus may display differently. Avoid using custom fonts, and stick to the five-by-five text rule to work around formatting changes.

Presentation Access Checklist

  • Make sure you can load your necessary files onto the desired presentation device. PowerPoint files may not embed all linked content, so be sure to move all the necessary media files with the presentation file. Test it on another device if you can.
  • Have two data copies of your presentation ready in case one fails. Store copies on a flash drive and external hard drive, an optical disc and a portable drive, or a flash drive and cloud storage. If you’re bringing your own device, have a copy on external storage just in case you need to present on a different device.
  • Avoid internet dependencies if at all possible.

The more familiar you become with a given presentation environment, the better able you will be to pinpoint the most important factors to check on before a presentation. The experts at MPA can also help your business streamline its presentation hardware and software configuration through productivity consulting and desktop management. Contact us today to find out more.

Problems with Power Loss: Tips for Workplace Computer Battery Backups

Wednesday, November 8th, 2017

It’s inevitable: employees working hard on a time-consuming project and then out of nowhere, the lights start to flicker and the power goes out. Suddenly, those workers express their frustration by pulling out their hair because they’ve just lost hours’ worth of work. In addition to being portable, laptop computers have a major advantage over their desktop counterparts: they can still work when the power goes out. Fortunately, battery backup devices also referred to as uninterruptible power supplies (UPS), keep desktop computers running even when the power isn’t working like their more portable counterparts.

What is a UPS?

A UPS is a battery-powered device that resembles a large surge protector designed to provide a continuous flow of electricity to any devices it plugs into. This provides protection from changes in the power flow including surges where too much power comes through, complete power loss when no power comes through, and fluctuations where the amount of provided power is insufficient to keep everything running. In short, UPS devices provide short-term disaster recovery.

Why You Need Protection from the Unpredictable

Unfortunately, it’s very difficult to predict when the power is going to fail. Occasionally, a powerful storm might blow through your area which increases the risk that the power will fail, but it’s no guarantee. Your office could experience 100 intense storms and never lose power, but then lose power for hours on a sunny, bright day because a strong wind gust knocked down a power line.

Installing a UPS device between a desktop computer and a power outlet can minimize power loss risk.

UPS Features

  • Types: There are two types of UPS devices: “standby” and “online.” Standby devices will switch on as soon as a power interruption is detected; however, there will be a several millisecond lag so that the computer may or may not avoid shutting down. Online UPS devices run the power to charge the battery and then continuously power the computer from the battery itself. Online UPS devices will not interrupt power until the battery is depleted.
  • Capacity: When selecting a UPS, you need to make sure the UPS is powerful enough to run your computer. Battery life can vary greatly depending on the UPS device capacity and how much wattage the computer will draw. Some devices can keep the computer running for hours, while others only a few minutes. Depending on the capacity, the UPS may serve as a “save now, shut down” backup or provide the ability to continue working.
  • Slots: The UPS has a specific amount of power outlets built in, so make sure it has enough to run the bare minimum. Do not be afraid to let non-essential devices like a second monitor or printers lose power.

Note: While laptop devices don’t need a UPS to keep running during a power outage, they still should be connected to a surge protector when charging to prevent device damage from power flow irregularity.

The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks are ready to help your business find strategies like adding UPS devices to desktop computers in order to increase productivity and avoid potential disasters. Contact us today to learn more!

Wireless Charging in the Workplace: iPhone Joins Android

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017

Wireless charging in the workplace has the potential to make it easier for your employees keep their arsenal of devices running throughout the day with fewer of those pesky low battery warnings. Until recently, wireless charging hasn’t been as good at increasing productivity as it could be because one of the major device manufacturers has held out on supporting it. Apple has finally jumped on the wireless charging bandwagon with the iPhone 8 and iPhone X, which means that a number of devices in your workplace that support wireless charging will likely reach a point where it may be worth it considering investing in some wireless chargers.

A Standard Emerges

One of the biggest problems holding wireless charging back has been a lack of a consistent standard; while some devices work on just about any wireless charger, others are more selective. Now that Apple has chosen to support the Qi standard, the two largest smartphone manufacturers — the other being Samsung — share a supported charging standard for the first time ever. The shared standard means it is now a safe investment for your workplace to get a Qi wireless charging mat for the conference room with the confidence that most of your staff will be able to use it.

The Problems Wireless Addresses

Wireless charging has a few advantages over its wired counterpart:

  • Reduces Port Wear: Outside of dropping your device and cracking the glass, breaking the charging port is the next most common way to disable it. Wireless charging actually gives new life to a device with a broken charging port and reduces wear-and-tear damage on the charging port because it isn’t being used as often.
  • One Charger, Multiple Devices: As Business Insider points out; wireless charging pads can charge more than one device at a time. This means an employee can place their smartphone, smartwatch, tablet, and earphones on the same pad instead of needing four charging cables.
  • Freedom from Easy-to-break Cables: Unfortunately, all that bending and twisting catches up to USB and Lightning charging cables: they tend to break from everyday use. Wireless charging solves this problem by eliminating the entire component.

The Downside to Wireless Charging

While wireless charging is convenient, advances in fast charging technology have made wired charging incredibly quick. For example, the new iPhones can charge 50 percent in 30 minutes and the Samsung Galaxy S8 can go from 0 percent to 100 percent in 80 minutes over fast charge. In order for wireless charging to meet those speeds, both the charging mat and the devices need to share a fast wireless charging compatibility. Therefore, if an employee is in a pinch to recharge a device quickly, a wired connection will be the safer bet.

If your business is looking to find better ways to use technology in the workplace, the IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help. Contact us today!

Flash Drives: A Productivity and Security Guide

Tuesday, September 26th, 2017

With proper planning, your business can take advantage of USB flash drive technology to increase productivity, while eliminating most of the medium’s inherent risk. The USB flash drives likely lying around your business offer excellent opportunities to increase productivity and make workflow easier, but also can be a data security breach waiting to happen. Properly used flash drives can be a great tool for your company, while improperly used flash drives are a major source of lost work and data.

Boundless Productivity Benefits

It’s an understatement to say that flash drives are really useful devices. The following list includes just a handful of the ways your business can utilize flash drives in the workplace:

  • Move large files between computers quickly on demand: Flash drives work very well when transferring large amounts of data between devices in cases where shared network connections and credentials are not viable. Using the flash drive means that you can copy from one system and paste to the other whenever it is convenient instead of at the same time, and it isn’t contingent on transfer speed from the local network or Internet connection.
  • Take work with you: Not all employees work on the same device all the time; flash drives are an easy, offline way to move work with you.
  • Make a toolkit: A flash drive toolkit is filled with software your staff may find useful including recovery and portable applications. Alternatively, the toolkit may include installers, patches, and serial code libraries for regularly used software your business uses.
  • Quick-and-dirty backup or recovery: Flash drives can be very helpful when making a quick backup of a computer or transferring data off of a distressed system that needs to be reformatted.

Data Theft: Drives that Contain Confidential Information Should be Encrypted

Flash drives feature a very small form factor which is great for portability; however, the smaller size also makes the devices prone to being lost or stolen. Therefore, any flash drive that is going to be used to store confidential data needs to be encrypted. Your business can purchase an encrypted drive or use specialized software to encrypt a standard drive. However, many encryption software options aren’t very portable or cross-platform friendly because they require software on any device accessing the encrypted drive. Windows 10 users can use the built-in BitLocker system and Mac users can use the Disk Utility application to password protect their flash drives.

Data Loss: Broken Flash Drives

While failure rates aren’t as bad as they used to be, flash drive technology is still prone to failure when improperly used. Live saving, or using a flash drive as the primary data storage location for a frequently updated file, can lead to a higher failure rate as can improperly disconnecting the device. Get the longest lifespan by primarily storing data on the local device and copying it over to the flash drive when done.

Is your business using its IT technology to its best potential? The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks are ready to help businesses in San Francisco, San Mateo, San Jose, and throughout the San Francisco Bay Area make sure that they are. Contact us today to learn more!

Screen Mirroring Mini-Guide

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Setting up your conference room for wireless screen mirroring is the answer to employees sharing in a collective groan when it’s time to connect a computer or mobile device to show a presentation. While setting up the conference room television or projector doesn’t have the same level of disdain as the office printer, it can still be a major source of frustration when half of your staff is in the conference room waiting for the technology to cooperate.

Screen mirroring allows any presenter, even a guest, to take a BYOD approach to giving a presentation with minimal effort. Not having to fiddle around with running cables and sorting through a “junk drawer” collection of video converters not only saves time but also increases productivity.

What is Screen Mirroring?

Screen mirroring, or screen casting, is when you duplicate the content on a computer or smart device on either a television screen or projector. In the past, someone would connect a computer to a TV or a projector through a cable which the device would treat just like a monitor. However, screen mirroring is different because it replicates the content on the device’s screen instead of treating the presentation device as a second screen. Modern smart devices and computers support screen mirroring, but the main problem arises when trying to find a setup that will support all of the common standards.

The Platforms:

  • Windows & Android Devices
    • While Windows and Android devices aren’t running software from the same companies, if a screen mirroring device supports one it more than likely supports the other. If your office has a smart TV or a smart projector, it might support screen mirroring out of the box for Windows and Android devices. However, if the TV or projector doesn’t have smart functionality, you can add support with a relatively inexpensive streaming device like MiracastRoku or WiDi adapters.
  • Mac Computers & iOS Devices
    • Supporting screen mirroring is very straight-forward, but there’s only one headache-free way to ensure support: connect an Apple TV device to the TV or projector. We’ve previously discussed setting up AirPlay through Apple TV. If you’re not going to use Apple TV, you’re stuck relying on finding a third-party receiver or app that supports AirPlay or messing with network settings every time you want to connect a device.

Device Checklist for Full Support

What your business should do is create a checklist for each of the four main device types and run a test of each to ensure compatibility. First, see which device types you can connect with your existing configuration. Next, determine which additional devices you’ll need to purchase for full support. An example setup could be a Samsung Smart TV paired with Apple TV or a standard LG TV with a Roku and Apple TV.

Streamlining your conference room screen mirroring setup is just one way the IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help your business increase productivity. Contact us today!

The System Is Down: How To Stay Online When Your Service Provider Is Offline

Tuesday, September 12th, 2017

It’s easy to take a functional Internet connection for granted until it’s no longer working. When that Internet connection inevitably goes down, your business could be left scrambling to figure out how to keep working until service is restored. The best solution your business can utilize is to develop an advance plan or an Internet outage backup plan for business continuity in the event of an Internet outage.

Purchase a Secondary Service

The safest and most reliable strategy your business can rely upon to work around Internet outages is to purchase a secondary Internet service. This service doesn’t need to be as high-speed as your main connection and it should be viewed as a safety net. The transition process can be as straight-forward as switching which modem connects to the office router.

Additionally, your business should invest in a different backup connection technology than your main connection; if your main connection comes from cable, try considering a DSL or T-line. If your business runs on a fiber service, your secondary platform can be from a cable provider. However, the secondary provider option may not be the most cost-effective solution for businesses with fewer than two-dozen employees.

Go Mobile (Internet) for an Internet Outage Backup Plan

Mobile Internet connections are another viable continuity option for smaller businesses: a tethered smartphone or mobile hotspot can work as a backup. The mobile option works well for smaller businesses and remote-employees. After all, mobile connections aren’t as fast and can lead to substantial data charges for businesses moving large amounts of data, so it’s not a good option if your business needs to move large files. Your corporation can also look outside of the cellular service providers for dedicated 3G/4G/LTE-based ISPs as an alternative secondary service option.

Nearby ISP Hotspots

If your company works out of a large office building with many nearby businesses you may be able to lean on your neighbors for some extra backup. Some ISPs offer Wi-Fi hotspots over all their rented modems. Then, if your business is on Verizon DSL and experiences an outage, you can use your home subscription to connect to a nearby Xfinity hotspot.

Hit the Street

If your employees need to get back online to handle immediate work, your company’s last line of defense is to lean on public Wi-Fi. You can find these hotspots at local libraries, cafés, coffee shops, and other storefronts. However, this comes with some major potential security risks; your employees shouldn’t come to rely on it with extremely confidential information.

One such risk is that it’s very common for hackers to set up “spoof” hotspots that resemble business hotspots, but are actually designed to steal your information. In other words, you have to make sure local hotspots are legitimate before using them. Keep a list of nearby secure Wi-Fi hotspots your employees can use in the event of an Internet outage. It’s of the utmost importance that this list is devised in advance because there are inherent risks in using another business’s Internet connection.

Never let an Internet outage keep your company from working: formulate an advanced backup plan so that your vital staff can keep working. If your company is looking for help developing an outage plan, the IT consulting experts at MPA Networks can help. Contact us today!

3 Lessons SMBs Can Learn From Retailers On Thanksgiving Weekend

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Online retailers are already working on business strategies for the Thanksgiving, Black Friday, and Cyber Monday online shopping weekend months in advance. These three days are the busiest online shopping days for retailers, bringing in nearly $6 billion in revenue combined. An online retailer’s worst nightmare on these days, in particular, is to lose business by overloading their platforms and losing customers because of long load times or crashes. SMBs can look at how retailers prepare and manage massive traffic influxes for insight into running a better online presence.

1. Do not launch a new service or platform when you expect to be busy

A robust testing and QA process is a business’s best tool to releasing features like a website update, a new software implementation, or a new hardware system as seamlessly as possible. However, some problems don’t reveal themselves until your business has pushed changes into the wild; in other words, your business doesn’t want to introduce new features that could expose problems at a busy time.

Therefore, it’s better to go with a “soft launch” for new implementations than try to run a high-traffic promotion to show off something new. Introduce new features and sweeping changes at a time when your company expects business to be slow.

2. Sometimes “bells and whistles” need to be dropped to stop from damaging functions

People tend to love “bells and whistles” features because they can take a boring product and turn it into an exciting experience. The more improved visual experience is great until it becomes detrimental to the performance. For example, retailers like Amazon will actually disable some of the rich content features on their product pages over the Thanksgiving shopping weekend, which simultaneously reduces the amount of work the servers complete when generating pages. This allows customers to load pages with minimal delay.

Retailers have to keep in mind the “user experience,” which includes the process of using a service as opposed to focusing on how it looks. SMBs can take this philosophy to heart when approaching technology: provide the best “form” as possible as long as it doesn’t impede “functionality.” A visually striking product preview page won’t do your business any good if customers refuse to sit through a long load time.

3. Don’t be a victim of your own success

Website overloads on Cyber Monday are a particularly great example of how a business can become a victim of its own success, which SMBs should keep in mind when running promotions. Unless a website’s hosting infrastructure is built with scaling potential or uses a CDN, a huge traffic spike can bring the site offline which translates to lost potential business and a negative brand impression.

Retailers typically use performance testing and monitoring strategies to prepare their platforms for massive traffic influxes. SMBs should keep a “ready-to-grow” philosophy in mind concerning their web presence because opportunity can strike at any time. Bracing for traffic spikes is particularly important when running social media promotion campaigns: if your business goes viral, you don’t want to miss out because your website is overloaded.

Whether your business is looking for opportunities to keep up with growth in cloud computing or seeing if new software would increase productivity, the IT consulting experts at MPA Networks are ready to help. Contact us today!

When Windows 10 Support Stops

Tuesday, August 22nd, 2017

In July of 2017, some Windows 10 users received an error message when trying to install the Creators Update, stating, “Windows 10 is no longer supported on this PC.” This first-of-its-kind problem stems from an incompatibility with a handful of Intel’s Clover Trail CPUs found in some of the earliest laptop, tablet, and 2-in-1 devices that shipped with Windows 8.1. While the issue affects a relatively small number of devices, it stands as a reminder that aging devices may not always be able to support the latest Windows 10 feature updates. The issue won’t create a security headache for users, but it could block new features your employees would otherwise use in order to increase productivity.

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There’s No Windows 11

Up until now, PC users have generally expected that devices working with a given version of Windows will continue to work on that version indefinitely; replacement time comes when the device can no longer run a newer Windows iteration. However, Windows 10 changes that because there won’t be a Windows 11; instead, Microsoft will continue to update Windows 10. Therefore, the system requirements for Windows 10 can’t be expected to stay the same as Microsoft updates the operating system so that devices running on today’s most recent version of Windows may not run all of Windows 10’s future features.

The Case of the Clover Trail Atom CPU:

As of July 2017, the Creators Update compatibility issue only affects the Atom Z2760, Z2520, Z2560, and Z2580 CPU models. As previously stated these CPUs belong to the Clover Trail family which was first released in Q3 2013. The issue has less to do with the processing power of the device and more to do with a compatibility problem with the CPU’s hardware drivers being incompatible with features in the Creators Update.

Windows 10 Support: Problems Down the Road

Hypothetically speaking, there are a number of issues that Windows 10 feature updates could add to the operating system that will render older devices incompatible or unable to run at a smooth speed. Lower-end devices that run inexpensive and weaker hardware are the most prone to being unable to support future updates. Some possible compatibility issues could include:

  • Insufficient RAM
  • Unsupported hardware drivers
  • CPU too slow
  • Not enough storage

What Next?

The good news here is that the devices are still compatible with the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, which will continue to receive security updates throughout the original Windows 8.1 device lifetime support window. The devices will still receive security updates, making it safe to continue using the devices. This isn’t like running a Windows XP computer on the modern Internet; if the device user doesn’t need the new Windows 10 features from the update, this really isn’t a big deal. However, after 2023, affected devices should be replaced.

Make sure your company’s computers and other devices are secure and able to perform to their highest ability. The IT consulting experts at MPA Networks are ready to help in San Mateo County and throughout the San Francisco Bay Area to keep your hardware and software up-to-date. Contact us today!