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Posts from May, 2017


Android and IOS: Is the Device Just Old, or Is It Obsolete?

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

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When trying to determine if a piece of technology is simply old or completely obsolete, keep in mind that there are different criteria for Android and iOS devices than for desktop and laptop computers. An employee stuck using an obsolete device is likely, after all, to argue that replacing it would increase their productivity.

On the flip side, replacing functional devices too often can spiral out of control into unnecessary expenses.

An IT consulting firm can help your business understand how long a device should remain in use, a safe time range for buying older models, and how to plan upgrade cycles.

How Long Before It’s Over?

The general rule is that a device becomes obsolete about four years after its release. This means that trying to save money by purchasing older devices on the cheap may not work out well, as they are unlikely to receive updates as long as a newer device. Usually you can buy only the most recent and second most recent smartphone devices new, but older refurbished devices are readily available.

The Issues with Old Devices

Determining if a device is aging vs. obsolete is pretty straightforward: If the employee can still complete all necessary work with the device, it is not yet obsolete.

However, older devices often have performance issues; notably, they may operate slower than the latest models. Older devices using Android often receive updates late, too, so users won’t receive security and interface improvement patches as soon as they’re available.

Obsolete Device Issues

Forbes paints a pretty grim picture of aging devices, declaring that smartphones have about two years before they’re obsolete. Still, users can typically continue on without any major problems for an additional year or two.

Once obsolete, however, many devices are prone to disruptive conditions:

  • Security updates are no longer provided.
  • Vital applications are no longer compatible with the operating system.
  • The web browser ceases to display web pages correctly.

The Apple Situation

Officially, Apple considers any product more than five years old obsolete, meaning the company tends to support their devices for a little longer than Android distributors. Apple usually supports iOS devices with the latest operating system for about four years. At this point the device will not receive updates, but it will still likely work for a while longer.

The device typically hits the obsolete category when it no longer runs the most recent version of iOS. If you buy an iOS device that’s already been on the market for two years, you’ll have to plan to replace it in another two years. A one-year-old device will be good for at least three years.

The Android Situation

Android devices have a two-tier obsolescence system in which system updates stop coming and applications stop working. Android is a much more difficult case to gauge because updates need to come through Google, go to the manufacturer, and then reach the phone provider.

Android users can expect operating upgrades for two years after the phone is released, and a few additional months of security updates; both are soft obsolescence moments. What finally ends an Android device’s life (or, at least, its usefulness) is application incompatibility after about four years, which is dependent on the developer. Most try to support the oldest version possible, but this is not always the case.

If you want to make sure your employees are using up-to-date devices that increase productivity, MPA Networks can provide an IT and productivity assessment. Contact us today.

7 Ways VoIP Increases SMB Productivity

Tuesday, May 16th, 2017

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Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) solutions can help small and medium businesses  increase productivity by enhancing your communication potential. VoIP isn’t just a simple digital upgrade over your existing office analog phone service: It opens the doors for new ways to look at customer management and employee communication. A managed service provider can help your business implement numerous best practices to reap the technological benefits of VoIP.

The following list covers just some of the ways VoIP can increase productivity:

1. Share a Phone System in Multiple Locations

If your business is looking to expand to additional locations or already operates from more than one building, VoIP can help consolidate many phone-based services. VoIP can share a singular phone system across multiple geographical locations. This means your business does not need to operate things like customer support and appointment scheduling at more than one location.

2. VoIP Allows Employees to Work Remotely

If your business receives just a handful of support calls on weekends, it’s wasteful to pay an employee to sit around and do nothing for most of the day. VoIP allows employees to connect to the service anywhere there’s an Internet connection. This way, you can allow on-call employees to work from home, meaning your business only has to pay for the time you need them.

3. Voicemail-to-Email Transcription

Employees often find themselves wasting time navigating voicemail systems in search of a specific recording, and then burn through more time sitting through entire messages full of unimportant information. VoIP services open the door for voice-to-text transcription capabilities so employees can quickly locate and read a message summary. This is a much more efficient way to handle voicemail, allowing employees to respond more accurately to more messages in less time.

4. Facilitates Employee Response to Issues

VoIP is a digital system you can integrate with your customer relationship management system so your staff will immediately have information about a customer or client on hand when they call. For example, if a customer has an outstanding service ticket, the representative answering the phone will have all that information on-hand.

5. Scales to Grows with your Business

Unlike the analog systems of old, VoIP is very easy to scale with your business’s needs. Adding an extra line for an additional employee isn’t necessary, as the system can accommodate capacity as needed.

6. Video Conference for Better Collaboration

Employees aren’t limited to audio-only conversations with VoIP: It supports video conferencing. Video calls can be very effective at increasing productivity in the workplace when employees who aren’t located together collaborate on projects.

7. VoIP Cost Savings

VoIP can also help your business bottom line. According to Forbes, Utah State was able to save six figures by switching their phone system from analog to VoIP. VoIP is also easier to maintain, with fewer technical problems when implemented: Utah State saved around $120,000 annually on labor by eliminating most of the trouble tickets.

The experts at MPA Networks are ready to help your business manage your VoIP services. Make sure you are properly configured and your network is built to handle the extra traffic without slowing down other services. Contact us today.

Scheduling Security: Take Control of Your OS Updates

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

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It happens to everyone: You turn your computer back on after you intended to leave the office, or come in early to get a head start on a new project, only to be greeted by a 20-minute operating system (OS) update session. This common workplace frustration turns what should have been a four-minute job into a half-hour ordeal, forcing you to stay behind or defeating any time gains from starting early.

OS updates provide essential security fixes that keep your business safe, but the platforms have a knack for pushing updates at what feels like “the worst possible time.”

Here’s what you can do to remain one step ahead of your updates at all times.

Change the Default Settings

Don’t leave operating system updates on their default settings, because they’re likely to interfere with work when you need the devices. The solution to this productivity- and attitude-killing problem is to adjust the system settings to force the updates at a specified time when your team won’t need them. Other software, like Office, Photoshop, and web browsers, tend to be less of a problem, since their update sessions are usually much quicker.

Updates Are a Security Issue

The worst solution to update inconvenience is to disable automatic updates. While updates that don’t add any new features may seem irrelevant, they’re actually doing lots of work keeping you safe behind the scenes in areas like IT security and virus/malware prevention.

According to TrendMictro, malware and other security exploits tend to target known security holes that have already been closed through updates and patches. Instead of finding new exploits, it’s easier for hackers to continue to exploit the old ones and take advantage of users who do not update their computer software.

Schedule Around Work to Increase Productivity

Microsoft usually posts their updates on the second Tuesday of every month, which is commonly known as “Patch Tuesday.” However, this may not work well with your business if it disables employee computers Tuesday night or Wednesday morning. The ideal time for updates will differ depending on your business, but for the typical Monday-to-Friday 9-to-5 office, you will be best served by installing updates around 2 a.m. on Sunday morning. Devices can even be individually customized for each employee based on their personal schedule.

The IT Consulting experts at MPA Networks, serving San Francisco, San Mateo County, San Jose, and other San Francisco Bay Area cities, are ready to help your business make technology work for you, not against you. Scheduling updates is a desktop management and support issue, which IT Managed Services can deliver. Contact us today to find out how we can help you better manage your office computers.

The Three Copies Rule: Why You Need Two Backups

Wednesday, May 3rd, 2017

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Anyone who has ever lost years of work due to computer failure will tell you that backing up your devices can save you considerable heartache and frustration. Reliable, redundant, and regular data backups are your business’s best strategy for disaster recovery—but two copies of your data may not be enough.

IT pros across the world have developed the “3-2-1” backup philosophy to maximize your restoration capacity following a data disaster.

The “3-2-1” Concept

The “3-2-1” approach is simple:

  1. Store three copies of your data.
  2. Utilize multiple storage formats.
  3. Keep one copy off-location.

TrendLabs says that having two backups of your data (meaning three copies total) is all about redundancy. IT professionals have nightmares about experiencing computer or server failure and preparing to restore the backup, only to find that the backup has failed as well. Your business can prevent this situation only by keeping two backup copies of all your important data.

We can’t stress often enough that three copies means three separate devices. Backing up data to a second hard drive in the same computer, or a connected SD card, does not count. This will only protect your data in the event that one of the hard drives breaks.

Some useful backup devices include:

  • External hard drives
  • NAS
  • Cloud storage
  • DVD/Blu-Ray discs
  • Flash drives
  • SD cards

Two Formats: Diversify Storage Media

Using different types of storage for backup improves reliability: It not only diversifies the factors that could cause the backup to fail, but also acts as an extra layer of protection. For example, if both backups are on external hard drives and exposed to a large magnet, both would be destroyed. However, a second copy stored on optical media or a flash drive would survive.

The two backup locations could include a backup external hard drive and cloud storage, or a DVD archive and an onsite NAS server. According to PC & Tech Authority, NAS servers are a great backup option for offices with several networked computers. We’ve discussed storage format longevity in previous blog posts if you need help deciding which one is right for you.

Keep at Least One Copy Offsite for “Catastrophe Recovery”

Catastrophe recovery is another way to describe a worst-case disaster recovery scenario: for instance, the hard drive didn’t fail, but a flood leveled your office, or someone stole both the computer and the backup in a burglary. In order to prevent an outright catastrophe, it’s not safe to keep every copy of your important data under the same roof.

This means, of course, that one of your backup copies should be stored in a secondary locationthe farther the better. The offsite backup could be, for example, a cloud backup, or an external hard drive stored in a bank deposit box. When working with a non-cloud, off-site solution, it helps to swap out two storage devices on a weekly basis.

If your company is looking to streamline its disaster recovery practices with IT Managed Services, contact the experts at MPA Networks today.